© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina
© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina
© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina
© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina
© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina
© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina
© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina
© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina
© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina
© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina
© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina
© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina
© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina
© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina
© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina
© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Katrina was the largest and third strongest storm ever to hit the United States. The official final death toll was at 1,836 victims, and millions were left homeless or affected in one way or another by the damage caused by the hurricane. How does an artist respond to all this?, wondered Stan Strembicki, professor of art in the College of Art photography program at Washington University.

This content is restricted to subscribers

Join FotoRoom

AmateurOnly €10/year ProOnly €20/yearRecommended!
Select Plan Select Plan

Photo Nita Vera

Keep looking...

Become a FotoRoom member (from €10/year)!